Why have four children when you could have seven?

By Jill Filipovic This piece originally ran on The Guardian.com. The article takes a thoughtful look into barriers to family planning uptake in Niger and the dilemma facing organizations like PSI working to meet the country’s high unmet contraceptive need. ____________________________________________________________________________________ With the world’s highest birthrate, Niger’s population is set to double in 17 years. NGOs are providing

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Health Programs Impacting Urban Youth

In celebration of International Youth Day, Global Health Youth Advisor Cate Lane discusses U.S. Government and USAID’s health programs impacting urban youth. This originally appears in the USAID Impact Blog.

The HealthyActions program in Liberia, under the Advancing Youth Project and in partnership with EDC delivers an HIV and family planning curriculum in alternative high schools for youth that have left the formal education system. Photo credit: USAID In 2010 I took a bike tour of Dar es Salaam’s slums. Over tea and chapattis my young guide told me he had lost both parents to AIDS. As the eldest, he had to ensure the education of his younger siblings. He dropped out of high school and migrated to Dar to work. Now at 24 with a good job, his siblings had finished school, and he was ready to return to school himself.

This glimpse of the vibrant yet chaotic life in Dar’s slums is one that we rarely see. I was struck by the large numbers of school-age youth in the streets working as petty traders: selling bananas, phone cards, sunglasses and pirated DVDs.

Dar is not unique. Rural to urban migration is accelerating, yet governments are ill-prepared to deal with it. In Timor L’este, I heard that that the capital’s population was growing by 10,000 people every year. Poorly serviced squatter settlements, slums, and camps are the norm in many cities, which are increasingly populated by youth seeking opportunities.

In Latin America and Asia, young female urban migrants outnumber young males. Many migrate to escape forced marriage or abusive relationships. UNICEF data from 12 countries show one in five migrant children aged 12–14 and half of those aged 15–17 move without a parent. Young urban migrants often find themselves in violent, stressful and unhealthy environments.

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