And the Winner Is…

What’s better than seeing “Will & Grace” come back to TV after eleven years off the air? Winning tickets to see it taped LIVE! Last month, PSI ran a sweepstakes to give away two tickets to “Will & Grace,” which were generously donated by PSI ambassador, Debra Messing. Debra is a passionate advocate for PSI’s

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PSI Global Ambassador Wins Women of Achievement Award

Congratulations to PSI Global Health Ambassador Debra Messing for being honored with the Women of Achievement Award at the 32nd Annual WP Theater Gala on Monday, March 27. The award honors women in theatre that have excelled not only in their profession, but also in their other endeavors. Debra joins the ranks of former award

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#EndAIDS: Moving Self-Testing from Theory to Reality

DURBAN, 20 July 2016 – How can HIV self-testing (HIVST) reduce the current HIV testing gap and help reach the United Nations 90-90-90 target? At the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS2016), UNITAID, Population Services International (PSI) and the World Health Organization (WHO) will host a joint satellite session to answer this question and provide insights into the HIV Self-Test AfRica

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PSI Ambassador Debra Messing Promotes AIDS Awareness and Treatment

Last week, PSI Global Ambassador and actress Debra Messing visited Washington, DC, to lend her voice to the growing call to end the AIDS epidemic and help fund programs that address the increased risk of HIV infections in women and girls in developing countries. Ms. Messing first spoke at the State Department on Monday. She

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PSI Ambassador Debra Messing Inspires Others to Raise Awareness and Help Stop HIV

By Margaret Cohen, Online Engagement and Fundraising, PSI   “I just wanted to share a little story about someone I met who had AIDS,” begins Teri, a former medical technician remembering the day in 1982 the first AIDS patient walked through the doors of her suburban Minneapolis hospital. She is warmed by the gratitude he

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PSI Ambassador on Celebrity Jeopardy TODAY!

By Maria Dieter, External Relations and Communications Assistant PSI’s celebrity ambassador, Debra Messing, will kick off Celebrity Jeopardy week today and she’s selected PSI to benefit from her winnings! To find out how and when to tune in to your ABC affiliate, click here. And to help get you in the Jeopardy mood, test your

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Inside the 2012 Impact Awards

During last week’s International AIDS Conference, PSI held its 2012 Impact Awards. HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway and Actress/PSI Ambassador Debra Messing co-hosted the event at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The focus of the event was to honor individuals who have made a lasting impact on the fight against AIDS.

The event also marked the recent release of our latest issue of Impact Magazine.  This quarter the focus is squarely upon HIV/AIDS by discussing the combined approach to HIV and AIDS. The issue presents interviews with leading HIV thought leaders and implementers, as well as personal stories from men and women living with HIV. Interviews include Impact Award winner Ron Zwanziger, Senator John Boozman (R-AR), Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA), Representative Barbara Lee (D-CA), Dr. Daniel Halperin and Craig Timberg, authors of the new book “Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome It,” and PSI technical experts.

“Turning the tide is only possible if we devote our minds, resources and support—collectively—to the global AIDS response,” said Messing. “This year’s Impact Awards celebrate a distinguished group of men and women who have helped make progress possible.”

A bit more about the winners:

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Debra Messing Chats HIV/AIDS Advocacy

PSI ambassador and actress Debra Messing sat down with Capitol Profile Magazine to discuss her advocacy efforts surrounding the issue of HIV/AIDS. Read the discussion:

In 2010, you testified before Congress, highlighting the need for more HIV/AIDS funding in developing countries. What has happened in the two years since you came to Washington for those meetings?
DEBRA MESSING: Today we are talking about creating an AIDS-free generation—that’s very different from two years ago. If you look at progress over the past decade, a dramatic and complete picture emerges. New HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths are at the lowest levels since the peak of the epidemic in 2001. The number of people living with HIV decreased by more than 25 percent between 2001 and 2009. But there are still two new HIV infections for every one HIV-infected person placed on treatment. So clearly there is still work to be done.

I’ve recently returned from a trip to Zambia in my role as an Ambassador for the global health organization, PSI. One thing people will be talking about at the International AIDS 2012 conference is the importance of “combination prevention” or packaging HIV prevention tools to approach prevention from every angle—for example, when we get more people tested, and more men circumcised and encourage fewer sexual partners, and make condoms readily available—we start to see greater results.

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The Faces of HIV in Zambia, Part 3: Meeting Nghimunya

In May, Debra Messing went to Zambia on a trip with PSI and Alere, the largest manufacturer of HIV testing technology. While there, she met with families, communities, health ministers, and doctors to learn about what HIV interventions are producing results on the ground — and what gaps need to be filled. This week, Debra is in Washington, D.C. to participate in the 2012 International AIDS Conference. Below is the third in a series of three personal journal entries that she wrote while in Zambia. Read Part 1 here and Part 2 here.

Wednesday, May 23: Counseling and testing center in Kanyama

I went through the counseling and testing process this week because I figured I needed to walk the walk if I was going to tell others, particularly couples, how important and easy it is to get tested. I think getting tested is one of the most sincere acts of love a couple can show for one another.

The testing center was at the local YWCA in Lusaka. I decided to get tested with Marshall, my friend and colleague from PSI, to send a message about the importance of couples getting tested. The clinic was clean, bright, and friendly. The counselor who tested us was incredibly thorough and professional and really helped me relax. We had our results in 20 minutes — so quick! I was surprised by how easy and painless the whole process was — and it was completely confidential. And for couples, it provides an open and honest environment to talk about risk, to disclose your status, and to chart your path together.

If either one of us had tested positive, the counselor would have walked us through exactly what we needed to know to stay healthy and live positively. It really was a fantastic experience. But as uplifting as the experience was, I kept thinking about Connie and the children she lost, and aboutIrene and how sick she became before she knew her status and could access medication. We need more people to get tested.

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The Faces of HIV in Zambia, Part 2: Meeting Irene

In May, Debra Messing went to Zambia on a trip with PSI and Alere, the largest manufacturer of HIV testing technology. While there, she met with families, communities, health ministers, and doctors to learn about what HIV interventions are producing results on the ground — and what gaps need to be filled. This week, Debra is in Washington, D.C., to participate in the 2012 International AIDS Conference. Below is the second in a series of three personal journal entries that she wrote while in Zambia. Read Part 1 here.

Monday, May 21: HIV post-test site in Bouleni

Today I discovered that compassion, love, determination, and hope are tools that need to be part of the “fight HIV” toolbox. The stories I heard this morning at a support group for people who recently tested positive broke my heart. Now I see why fighting the stigma and discrimination around HIV is so important to prevention. It’s one of the main reasons that people wait so long to get tested — and run the risk of spreading the virus to the people about whom they care most.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when we drove up a dusty road to a Catholic church. I knew this was the fourth in a series of meetings to provide information and support for those newly diagnosed with HIV. Before entering, I stopped outside to play with some kids who were kicking a soccer ball and just goofing around. After a few minutes I entered a big, bright room and took my seat in the middle of a group of about 25 people: men, women, old and young, some with their children.

I greeted the group through Rogers, one of the many amazing staff from SFH. Rogers manages support sites like the one I visited. At first the group was shy, so I decided I would start, and I shared how I became involved in HIV/AIDS work: My favorite acting teacher, for whom my son is named, died of AIDS complications. It destroyed me. I vowed I would do what I could to prevent more loss as a result of HIV, and also change how people with HIV/AIDS were treated.

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The Faces of HIV in Zambia, Part 1: Meeting Connie

In May, Debra Messing went to Zambia on a trip with PSI and Alere, the largest manufacturer of HIV testing technology. While there, she met with families, communities, health ministers, and doctors to learn about what HIV interventions are producing results on the ground — and what gaps need to be filled. This week, Debra is in Washington, D.C. to participate in the 2012 International AIDS Conference. Below is the first in a series of three personal journal entries that she wrote while in Zambia. Read parts two and three.

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Sunday, May 20: JoyFM radio show in Lusaka

The plane descended through the clouds, and I could see the city of Lusaka from my window seat. I began to think about the people I’ll meet this week: people who are helping prevent HIV in Zambia, people who are living with HIV and thriving thanks to treatment and support services, people who are suffering and stigmatized. It had been two years since my last trip with PSI, so I was feeling excited and nervous.

Nervousness quickly turned to awe when I met Connie.

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“Everyone Is Entitled To Their Own Opinion, But Not Their Own Facts”

I love the rain. I joke that the rains were the trumpet announcing my birth – I was born right after the rainy season, when the earth is full of life. On that beautiful Monday in April, on the 16th in 1979, that sweet scented sign of life saw me into this world. I’m 33

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