Improving Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension Services in Honduras

By Marcela Assunção and Denise Rivera Milla, 2016 Alere Fellows at PSI The piece below originally appeared on Alere’s blog.  NOTE: PSI is a global health organization that focuses on making it easier for people in the developing world to lead healthier lives and plan the families they desire by marketing affordable products and services.

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Fortune 500 Salutes PSI’s Corporate Partners

By Jenny Tolep, External Relations & Communications Fresh off the press — Fortune magazine just released the 2015 Fortune 500 list of top corporate companies and seven of PSI’s corporate partners made the list. Like all of PSI’s corporate partners, these companies are addressing global development challenges in ways that harness their core business skills

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Alere Kicks Off Research for Ultra-Sensitive Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test

As countries move from malaria control towards its elimination, there is a shift from passive to active case detection — moving from detecting ‘only’ clinical cases seeking treatment at fixed health facilities to actively seeking out all cases in the community. The next step is moving beyond case detection to finding all infections, including asymptomatic

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Innovation is Challenging the Status Quo, Creating Solutions from the Ground Up

Q&A with Duncan Blair, Director of Public Health Initiatives, Alere, Inc. Impact: How does Alere determine the best investment in terms of value, discipline, audiences and opportunity? ➤Duncan Blair: Alere, like any company, has to consider market opportunities when contemplating an investment. But there is also a genuine vision and mission within the company to

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Public-Private Partnerships Thrive

Impact interviews Geralyn Ritter, Senior Vice President of Global Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility, and President of the Merck Company Foundation, about the Merck Company’s new partnership Merck for Mothers, a 10-year, $500 million initiative to reduce maternal mortality globally, which Geralyn oversees. – ➤ Geralyn Ritter: We are excited to be partnering with PSI

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Battling Stigma on World AIDS Day

By Paul T. Hempel – Sr. VP Ethics / Compliance, Alere Inc.

As I approach World AIDS Day 2012, just after Thanksgiving, I am reflecting about how much there is to be thankful for this year for those of us living with HIV. For more than a year now, we have known that, if properly treated, the spread of the disease drops by more than 96%, suggesting that there may be the possibility to end the spread of HIV. This year at the World AIDS Conference in Washington, there was talk of testing new drug therapies which might even lead to a cure within my lifetime. And more importantly, better access to good meds allows a longer lifespan for those of us living with HIV than at any time since its discovery.

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Inside the 2012 Impact Awards

During last week’s International AIDS Conference, PSI held its 2012 Impact Awards. HRH Crown Princess Mette-Marit of Norway and Actress/PSI Ambassador Debra Messing co-hosted the event at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The focus of the event was to honor individuals who have made a lasting impact on the fight against AIDS.

The event also marked the recent release of our latest issue of Impact Magazine.  This quarter the focus is squarely upon HIV/AIDS by discussing the combined approach to HIV and AIDS. The issue presents interviews with leading HIV thought leaders and implementers, as well as personal stories from men and women living with HIV. Interviews include Impact Award winner Ron Zwanziger, Senator John Boozman (R-AR), Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA), Representative Barbara Lee (D-CA), Dr. Daniel Halperin and Craig Timberg, authors of the new book “Tinderbox: How the West Sparked the AIDS Epidemic and How the World Can Finally Overcome It,” and PSI technical experts.

“Turning the tide is only possible if we devote our minds, resources and support—collectively—to the global AIDS response,” said Messing. “This year’s Impact Awards celebrate a distinguished group of men and women who have helped make progress possible.”

A bit more about the winners:

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The Faces of HIV in Zambia, Part 3: Meeting Nghimunya

In May, Debra Messing went to Zambia on a trip with PSI and Alere, the largest manufacturer of HIV testing technology. While there, she met with families, communities, health ministers, and doctors to learn about what HIV interventions are producing results on the ground — and what gaps need to be filled. This week, Debra is in Washington, D.C. to participate in the 2012 International AIDS Conference. Below is the third in a series of three personal journal entries that she wrote while in Zambia. Read Part 1 here and Part 2 here.

Wednesday, May 23: Counseling and testing center in Kanyama

I went through the counseling and testing process this week because I figured I needed to walk the walk if I was going to tell others, particularly couples, how important and easy it is to get tested. I think getting tested is one of the most sincere acts of love a couple can show for one another.

The testing center was at the local YWCA in Lusaka. I decided to get tested with Marshall, my friend and colleague from PSI, to send a message about the importance of couples getting tested. The clinic was clean, bright, and friendly. The counselor who tested us was incredibly thorough and professional and really helped me relax. We had our results in 20 minutes — so quick! I was surprised by how easy and painless the whole process was — and it was completely confidential. And for couples, it provides an open and honest environment to talk about risk, to disclose your status, and to chart your path together.

If either one of us had tested positive, the counselor would have walked us through exactly what we needed to know to stay healthy and live positively. It really was a fantastic experience. But as uplifting as the experience was, I kept thinking about Connie and the children she lost, and aboutIrene and how sick she became before she knew her status and could access medication. We need more people to get tested.

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The Faces of HIV in Zambia, Part 2: Meeting Irene

In May, Debra Messing went to Zambia on a trip with PSI and Alere, the largest manufacturer of HIV testing technology. While there, she met with families, communities, health ministers, and doctors to learn about what HIV interventions are producing results on the ground — and what gaps need to be filled. This week, Debra is in Washington, D.C., to participate in the 2012 International AIDS Conference. Below is the second in a series of three personal journal entries that she wrote while in Zambia. Read Part 1 here.

Monday, May 21: HIV post-test site in Bouleni

Today I discovered that compassion, love, determination, and hope are tools that need to be part of the “fight HIV” toolbox. The stories I heard this morning at a support group for people who recently tested positive broke my heart. Now I see why fighting the stigma and discrimination around HIV is so important to prevention. It’s one of the main reasons that people wait so long to get tested — and run the risk of spreading the virus to the people about whom they care most.

I wasn’t sure what to expect when we drove up a dusty road to a Catholic church. I knew this was the fourth in a series of meetings to provide information and support for those newly diagnosed with HIV. Before entering, I stopped outside to play with some kids who were kicking a soccer ball and just goofing around. After a few minutes I entered a big, bright room and took my seat in the middle of a group of about 25 people: men, women, old and young, some with their children.

I greeted the group through Rogers, one of the many amazing staff from SFH. Rogers manages support sites like the one I visited. At first the group was shy, so I decided I would start, and I shared how I became involved in HIV/AIDS work: My favorite acting teacher, for whom my son is named, died of AIDS complications. It destroyed me. I vowed I would do what I could to prevent more loss as a result of HIV, and also change how people with HIV/AIDS were treated.

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Q&A with Ron Zwanziger, Alere, Inc.

Debra Messing: While in Zambia, I met a woman named Connie who inspired me with her story and incredible passion to help others. She lost her first three children to AIDS complications because she did not know her status. After a long and very difficult struggle to regain her physical and mental health, Connie became

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Personal Reflections From HIV Positive Zambians

The following originally appeared on the Alere Make More Positive Blog as a part of their series reviewing the recent advocacy trip to Zambia with Debra Messing & PSI. Each are personal reflections and personal stories from Zambians living with HIV. See the other posts in the series here.

SIKAKENAMULIKITA, Age 35. If people were told at birth they were dying they might live a fuller life. How true this has been for me. The day I realized I was going to die, that day I started to live.

The realization of death is not the resignation to live truth but more the desire to live a complete and meaningful life. When I was diagnosed with HIV, this brought a lot of pain and emotional suffering into my life. But it was also a gift! I didn’t expect myself to be alive this long. I was scared, ignorant, and owe who might I can never have HIV, thanks to Anti-Retrovirals.

I believe many things are uncertain in life; to feel sorry/angry for myself/be depressed will not change my status. I had a stroke, my immunity was low, for me to be alive today! The secret lies in keeping the mind, spirit healthy by focusing on positives in life -my attitude and behavior, my hopes and dreams. I have gone through a personal transformation.

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